Arthur Walker

A skull, roses, and a broken heart… a songwriter talks to the artist about creating album cover art

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Arthur Walker

What goes into creating album art? We asked Steve Stones, singer and songwriter of power-band Arthur Walker to speak to the create or the bands Animal Nights album cover art

Who are you and how do you describe what you do?
My name is Caroline, I paint, I draw, I tattoo, I generally like to have a go at most creative things!

What’s your background?
I’d always loved to draw, paint and get messy. I went to Plymouth High School for Girls, Plymouth Art College and did a brief spell at Manchester Metropolitan University doing interior design. I guess you can say I never really knew what I wanted to do, but I knew I wanted to stay creative. I now work in a printers, paint when I can and am learning the art of tattooing, which I love!

You say for the album art of Arthur Walker took inspiration from aspects of their lyrics. Which lyrics inspired you, and why?
The band approached me with their album cover ideas and I got inspiration from some of the song titles. They gave me requirements for a skull, roses, a broken heart, machinery with a tattoo-inspired theme… ideal for me as I love to design traditional-style tattoos and this gave me the perfect chance to experiment, the band liked it and I’m very proud to put it as one of my achievements!

What usually inspires you?
People, colour, my friends, flowers. I like bright colours and interesting textures. I like my work to make people feel happy when they look at it, brighten their day as it were. I do believe inspiration comes and goes – you really do need to be “in the mood” to paint and have a great deal of motivation to get to it. It can be hard sometimes, but you should never give up and keep trying!

Do you tend to tell stories through your work?
My works is pretty simple… it looks nice, if i were to tell a story though my work it would probably be quite grim ha ha… No really, I do whatever I feel at the time, there really is no deep meaning behind my work, sorry to disappoint! At the moment I take my inspiration from tattoo design, especially old school styles. I especially love skulls, hearts, roses, orchids and lillies!

You’ve recently branched into tattoo art, and painting people! Do you work in a completely different mindset than you would when painting on canvas?
Tattoo art is completely different. Not only is it a permanent piece of art, it’s very important to get it right so there is less flow and more pressure!

Also, you are usually working to someone else’s design and not your own. However, it’s a great challenge and I  enjoy it.

How do you find the attitudes art lovers/critics in Plymouth, and is Plymouth a place that encourages your artistic endeavours?
I think the attitude towards art has got better. I remember when I left school, art was frowned upon, but now it’s greatly encouraged which is good. However, there is still a snobbery surrounding being an ‘artist’. I belong to an art group called Plymouth Art Group. We started it to be part of a group which could meet up every now and then and just encourage each other and give us a goal with our work, no pressure at all. I find with many groups or galleries here in plymouth, you have to be ‘somebody’ to get in, or to exhibit your work. It’s a shame really.

This is an article from our Plymouth ArtsCulture magazine, which you can read for free online, or buy your own copy to cherish and hold.






One thought on “A skull, roses, and a broken heart… a songwriter talks to the artist about creating album cover art”

  1. With the advent of the information age and music downloads Im glad this is artform that is still flourishing

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