All posts by Philip Kingslan John

Philip Kingslan John is a Devon-based artist and theatre practitioner. Check out his website.

The Dumb Waiter at The Bike Shed Theatre: relentless escalating tension and commanding performances

Dumb Waiter at The Bike Shed Theatre

Despite having studied English Literature at university, I have never read a Pinter play. Nor have I, before last night at least, seen one performed: shameful I know, but there it is. So it was to my great delight and educational advancement that I was invited to attend The Bike Shed Theatre in Exeter’s new production of Harold Pinter’s The Dumb Waiter.

Continue reading The Dumb Waiter at The Bike Shed Theatre: relentless escalating tension and commanding performances

Josh’s Monsters at The Bike Shed Theatre is intimate, immersive and utterly compelling

Josh's Monsters

This week The Bike Shed Theatre in Exeter is hosting Josh’s Monsters, an utterly compelling new drama from celebrated North Devon company Multistory. My attendance at yesternight’s opening was a challenging but fulfilling experience.

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Cul-De-Sac at The Bike Shed Theatre, Exeter, explores real human emotion in the face of a crisis

Philip Kingslan John

The Bike Shed Theatre, Exeter’s most vibrant dramatic venue, opened a new play by Neil Bebber, entitled Cul-De-Sac.

The play is built on an intriguing premise: an asteroid plummets towards the earth, promising the end of civilization, and three sets of neighbours who have never actually spoken to each other before are finally forced to interact. This is all in a very English, very white middle class kind of a way, and in marked contrast to the overblown histrionics and heroics we have seen in countless Hollywood depictions of the apocalypse. At one point the character “Carla” openly laments the lack of blind panic (and more precisely, the lack of blind panic induced public love-making…!)

Continue reading Cul-De-Sac at The Bike Shed Theatre, Exeter, explores real human emotion in the face of a crisis